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Courses

Chemistry majors enjoy a learning environment defined by the close interaction between faculty and students. A majority of chemistry majors build on those strong faculty relationships by undertaking undergraduate research under a professor who works in their particular field of interest.

Students learn to use a variety of important modern instrumentation techniques and receive significant laboratory training as part of their coursework in the Department of Chemistry. Students can expect to get hands-on training using a high-field NMR, gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, electrochemistry, spectrofluorimetry and ultra violet-visible spectrophotometry.

First-year students are encouraged to investigate the University's new integrated quantitative (IQ) science course, a year-long class team taught by 10 professors that combines material from the introductory courses in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics and computer science.

Courses
CHEM 110 Pollutants in the Environment
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNC)
Description
Sources, behavior, and effects of chemical pollutants in the air, water, and soil. Topics include global warming, ozone depletion, acid rain, pesticides, and radioactive waste. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Does not count toward the chemistry major or minor. Same as Environmental Studies 110.
Prerequisites
None (high school chemistry desirable).

CHEM 111 Chemistry Detectives: Solving Real-World Puzzles
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNC)
Description
A laboratory-based course in which students learn the language and techniques used in industrial and forensic laboratories to conduct organic chemical analysis. Students become "chemistry detectives," able to solve the types of "chemistry puzzles" that are characteristic of the fun part of doing chemistry (e.g. how chemists, such as forensic and pharmaceutical chemists, determine the structure of real-world unknown compounds). A range of applications of this chemistry is discussed, including such topics as environmental, medicinal, polymer, forensic and industrial chemistries, government regulations, natural products, pheromones, and information retrieval. In the process, students will gain hands-on experience using modern instrumentation, including IR, NMR, GC-Mass Spec, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Does not count toward the chemistry major or minor.
Prerequisites
High school chemistry or permission of instructor.

CHEM 112 Biochemistry in the Real World
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNC)
Description
The genomics revolution of the last 10 years has given birth to the "proteome," emphasizing the central role that proteins play in virtually all life and death processes. This course will explore central features of what proteins look like and how they perform their varied functions in a variety of biological and chemical processes. These will include aspects of cell differentiation, cell death, and disease states such as cancer, Alzheimer's, and viral infections by Epstein-Barr virus, papillomavirus, and AIDS. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Does not count toward the chemistry major or minor.

CHEM 113 Catching Criminals with Chemistry
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNC)
Description
Investigation of how chemistry can be applied to solving crimes. The nature of physical evidence will be discussed, along with the chemical techniques used to gather and analyze that evidence. The course will also introduce students to the legal aspects surrounding the introduction of evidence into a court of law, thus providing an interdisciplinary focus for those interested in science and law. By combining case studies with applicable technology, students will gain a heightened understanding of the important roles that chemistry plays in forensic science. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. This course does not count towards the chem major or minor.

CHEM 114 The Chemistry of Cooking and Modernist Cuisine
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement FSNC
Description
Improves understanding of the scientific principles of food and cooking. Investigates how scientific principles and techniques have revolutionized the culinary industry. Focuses on the molecular bases of food and their reactivity under various conditions. A hands-on look at applied chemical principles as seen in cooking during three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. One year of High School Chemistry is recommended. This course does not count towards the chemistry major or minor.

CHEM 115 Chemistry in Art
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement FSNC
Description
Various chemistries employed in art and the development/use of colors. The nature of color, creating color, and fastening color will be discussed, along with the chemical techniques used in developing/following these processes. Introduces a range of laboratory techniques commonly used in various art mediums, but through a physical science lens. Combines theoretical science concepts with current art practices for a more developed understanding of the vital contributions that chemistry provides to art. Topics covered will include the properties of light, native metals and their compounds, ceramics, polymers, film formation, and paint binders. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. This course does not count toward the chemistry major or minor.

CHEM 141 Introductory Chemistry: Structure, Dynamics and Synthesis
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement (FSNC)
Description
Fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, periodicity; chemical reactions, including stoichiometry, acid base chemistry, oxidation-reduction; and an introduction to kinetics and thermodynamics, chemical reactions and, equilibria. Introductory course for science majors and those pursuing degrees in the health sciences. It is a prerequisite for upper-level courses. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Previous knowledge of chemistry is helpful but not assumed. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: CHEM 141, CHEM 191, or CHEM 192.

CHEM 191 Integrated Science/Math/Computer Science 3 with Laboratory
Units: 1
Description
One of two courses taught spring semester as part of Integrated Quantitative Science program. Will integrate topics from Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Math and Computer Science and will include instructors from all five disciplines. Each semester of the course will be organized around a guiding principle that integrates several concepts. Along with co-requisite, will include ten hours for lecture and lab combination. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: CHEM 141, CHEM 191, or CHEM 192.
Prerequisites
High school calculus. Biology 190 and Math 190. Co-requisite: Physics 191. Acceptance to Intergrative Quantiative Science course required.

CHEM 192 Science, Math and Research Training II
Units: 1
Fulfills General Education Requirement FSNC
Description
Year-long course provides an, interdisciplinary, integrated introduction to biology and chemistry, with an accompanying integrated lab. Based on the material in the first course of the major in each of these disciplines, this course will focus on current scientific problems facing today's world such as HIV/AIDS or antibiotic resistance. The course is team taught by two faculty members, one from each discipline. Teaching will be integrated so that links between concepts are readily apparent and students are stimulated to think beyond traditional science methodology. The laboratory will be comprised of hands-on and investigation based experiences using both experimental and computer simulation approaches. The SMART course is designed for students considering a major in either biology or chemistry and also meets requirements for students who go on to study medicine or other health sciences fields. To be taken in consecutive semesters in the first year and with an accompanying year-long calculus course. Completion of the full year of SMART (CHEM 192) will substitute for CHEM141 and BIOL 199. 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours per week. Students may only receive credit for one of the following: CHEM 141, CHEM 191, or CHEM 192.
Prerequisites
BIOL 192.

CHEM 204 Organic Chemistry I SA
Units: 1.5
Description
Chemistry of compounds of carbon, which is fundamental to understanding of both chemistry and biology. Nomenclature, structure-physical property relationships, reactions, reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy and introduction to macromolecules, including those of biological significance. This course is only offered at St. Andrews.
Prerequisites
Departmental approval required.

CHEM 205 Organic Chemistry I
Units: 1
Description
Chemistry of compounds of carbon, which is fundamental to understanding of both chemistry and biology. Nomenclature, structure-physical property relationships, reactions, reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy and introduction to macromolecules, including those of biological significance. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 141 or 191 or 192 with a grade of C- or better.

CHEM 206 Organic Chemistry II
Units: 1
Description
Chemistry of compounds of carbon, which is fundamental to understanding of both chemistry and biology. Nomenclature, structure-physical property relationships, reactions, reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy and introduction to macromolecules, including those of biological significance. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 205 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 220 Projects
Units: .25-.5
Description
Laboratory or community-based learning experience with a faculty member.

CHEM 230 Special Topics in Chemistry
Units: .5-1
Description
Considers subject matter not covered in other chemistry courses. See the chemistry department home page for special topics currently scheduled.

CHEM 300 Measurement Statistics
Units: 1
Description
Overview of statistics of measurements on chemical systems. Includes characteristics of data which contain random error. Statistics used to describe and summarize trends of measured data will be introduced, as well as a number of statistical tools needed to draw meaningful and objective conclusions based on data. Should be taken simultaneously with, or prior to, Chemistry 301. Three lecture hours per week.

CHEM 301 Quantitative Methods of Chemical Analysis
Units: 1.5
Description
Principles and techniques of chemical and instrumental methods used for quantitative analysis. Includes lecture coverage and extensive laboratory use of gravimetric, titrimetric, electrochemical, and spectroscopic methods. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 300 and 317. Chemistry 300 may be taken concurrently.

CHEM 302 Spectroscopy and Instrumentation
Units: 1.5
Description
Principles and techniques of chemical and instrumental methods used for compound identification. Focus on modern instrumental methods for compound structure elucidation and the principles underlying both the spectroscopic methods and the instrumentation itself. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 206.

CHEM 303 Separations
Units: 1
Description
Principles, theory, and techniques central to chemical separation sciences--both classical and instrumental methods used for compound separation and purification, as well as factors important to industrial scalability versus nanoscale applications. Focus on modern theories and implementations of instrumental methods for compound separations and principles underlying instrumentation. Three to four hours of lecture and/or laboratory per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 301 or 302.

CHEM 308 Statistical Mechanics
Units: 1
Description
(See Physics 308.)

CHEM 309 Physical Chemistry I
Units: 1
Description
Study of the principal laws and theories of chemistry: gas laws and kinetic molecular theory, classical and statistical thermodynamics, wave mechanics and molecular structure, and chemical kinetics. Principles and properties of liquids, solids and solutions, and phase equilibria are also examined along with electrochemistry. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 141 or 191 or 192; Physics 132; and Mathematics 212 or 232; or permission of instructor. Chemistry 317 is highly recommended.

CHEM 310 Physical Chemistry II
Units: 1
Description
Study of the principal laws and theories of chemistry: gas laws and kinetic molecular theory, classical and statistical thermodynamics, wave mechanics and molecular structure, and chemical kinetics. Principles and properties of liquids, solids and solutions, and phase equilibria are also examined along with electrochemistry. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 141 or 191 or 192; Physics 132; and Mathematics 212 or 232; or permission of instructor. Chemistry 317 is highly recommended.

CHEM 311 Theoretical and Computational Chemistry
Units: 1
Description
Involves the fundamental study of the structure, energetics, and behavior of molecular systems using tools from mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology as implemented on a computer. Will cover the basics of the field including, but not limited to, molecular mechanics, quantum mechanics, hybrid methods, and docking. These tools can be applied to problems in drug design, protein folding, reaction mechanisms, and prediction of molecular phenomenon, to name a few.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 141 or 191 or 192 and Mathematics 212 or 232

CHEM 313 The Natures of the Chemical Bond
Units: 1
Description
Builds on the bonding ideas introduced in the general and introductory chemistry curriculum. Enables meaningful access to the chemical literature on experimental and computational studies of bonding in molecules and solids for systems spanning the entire periodic table. Spans orbital and atoms-in-molecules models of bonding (with perspectives on functional group), phenomena such as halogen, aurophilic (metallophilic) interactions, aromaticity (organic and inorganic), thermodynamic vs. kinetic stability of compounds, and chemical views on extended solids.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 141, 191 or 192 and Mathematics 212 or 232.

CHEM 314 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I
Units: .5
Description
Experimental course corresponding to Chemistry 309. Covers critical experiments related to the theoretical treatments of gas laws, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. Introduction to scientific writing and basic error propagation.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 309

CHEM 315 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II
Units: .5
Description
Experimental course corresponding to Chemistry 310. Covers critical experiments related to the theoretical treatments of quantum mechanics, spectroscopy and to a lesser extent, statistical mechanics.
Prerequisites
CHEM 310 is a co-requisite for CHEM 315.

CHEM 316 Environmental Chemistry
Units: 1
Description
Study of the fate, transport, and distribution of chemicals in the environment. The chemistry of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere will be covered, highlighting effects of inorganic and organic pollutants. Topics such as global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, photochemical smog, and groundwater contamination will be discussed in detail. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 205 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 317 Inorganic Chemistry
Units: 1
Description
Inorganic chemistry embraces the chemistry of all of the elements. This course will focus on the synthesis and behavior of inorganic materials. As such, it will include certain aspects of thermodynamics, atomic and molecular bonding theories, kinetics, and electrochemical processes as they pertain to inorganic compounds and materials. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 206.

CHEM 320 Introduction to Research
Units: .5-1
Description
Laboratory research experience with a faculty member. Please note that students are not allowed to take both CHEM 320 and CHEM 321 in the same term.

CHEM 321 Advanced Independent Research
Units: .5-1
Description
Advanced laboratory research experience with a faculty member. Students are limited to two units of CHEM 321. Please note that students are not allowed to take both CHEM 320 and CHEM 321 in the same term.
Prerequisites
CHEM 406 or 2 semesters of CHEM 320.

CHEM 322 Junior Seminar
Units: 0
Description
Regular attendance in departmental seminar program. Normally taken in the junior year. One class hour per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 206.

CHEM 324 Experimental Biochemistry
Units: .5
Description
Experimental course will cover critical techniques in biochemistry, including protein purification, enzyme kinetics, and protein structural analysis.
Prerequisites
CHEM 326 (may be taken concurrently)

CHEM 325 Experimental Biophysical Chemistry
Units: .5
Description
Experimental course that will cover critical techniques in biophysical chemistry, including thermodynamics, bioinformatics, and macromolecular function.
Prerequisites
CHEM 309, 326 (326 may be taken concurrently)

CHEM 326 Biochemistry
Units: 1
Description
Structure and chemistry of biologically important macromolecules and chemical processes involved in cellular synthesis degradation, and assembly of these macromolecules. Three lecture hours and an extra experience per week. (Same as BIOL 326.) Please note that CHEM 326 may be used to satisfy program requirements in only one department. For example, it cannot count as elective credit for both the Biology major (or minor) and a Chemistry major (or minor).
Prerequisites
Chemistry 206.

CHEM 327 Biochemistry with Laboratory
Units: 1
Description
Structure and chemistry of biologically important macromolecules and chemical processes involved in cellular synthesis degradation, and assembly of these macromolecules. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. This course is restricted to students who are Biochemistry and Molecular Biology majors or obtain permission from the instructor. Please note that CHEM 327 may be used to satisfy program requirements in only one department/program. For example, it cannot count toward the BMB major and also be used as an elective for the Chemistry or Biology major or minor.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 206.

CHEM 329 Protein Structure, Function and Biophysics
Units: 1
Description
Advanced topics in protein structure, function, and biophysics. Commences with brief treatment of essential elements of kinetics, thermodynamics, and quantum mechanics necessary for a thorough understanding of topics to be presented later and continues with detailed coverage of enzyme kinetics and ligand binding, chemical modification, site-directed mutagenesis, x-ray crystallography, spectroscopic techniques used to investigate conformation, and the folding of proteins, including Circular Dichroism, Fluorescence and NMR; and computational approaches used to compute and visualize both structure and reaction. Second half of course focuses on three classes of proteins and associated themes: 1) kinases, phosphatases, and regulation, 2) proteases and processes and 3) oligomeric enzymes and allosteric models. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 327.

CHEM 330 Special Topics in Biochemistry
Units: .5-1
Description
Special course areas in biochemistry will be covered when sufficient interest exists. Considers subject matter not covered in other chemistry courses. See the chemistry or biochemistry and molecular biology department home pages for special topics currently scheduled.
Prerequisites
CHEM 326 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 332 Molecular Spectroscopy
Units: 1
Description
Covers the major forms of molecular spectroscopy including vibrational-rotational spectroscopy of diatomic molecules, rotational spectroscopies of polyatomic molecules, vibration of polyatomic molecules, electronic spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Particular attention will be paid to the quantum mechanical theory of each of these forms of spectroscopy, especially time-dependent perturbation theoretical approaches. In addition, emphasis will be placed on the full range of structural and dynamical information that can be extracted from each type of spectrum.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 310.

CHEM 342 Medicinal Chemistry
Units: 1
Description
Provides basic principles of the drug discovery process. Topics include general considerations, mode of action, quantitative structure activity relationships, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and inactivation of medicinal agents. In addition, major drug classes will be presented along with specific case studies for each category. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 206.

CHEM 343 Organic Reactions and Mechanisms
Units: .5-1
Description
Topics may include reaction mechanisms, physical organic chemistry concepts, the development of catalysts for organic reactions, stereochemically controlled reactions, and/or the application of inorganic chemistry to organic reactions. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites
CHEM 206.

CHEM 344 Organic Synthesis
Units: .5-1
Description
Topics may include modern synthetic methods, organic reaction mechanisms, examples of syntheses from recent literature, and the design of synthetic approaches to target molecules of interest. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 206.

CHEM 401 Quantum Mechanics
Units: 1
Description
(See PHYS 309-PHYS 310.) Please note that CHEM 401 (PHYS 309) may be used to satisfy program requirements in only one department. For example, it cannot count toward both a Physics major (or minor) and a Chemistry major (or minor).

CHEM 402 Quantum Mechanics
Units: 1
Description
(See PHYS 309-PHYS 310.) Please note that CHEM 402 (PHYS 310) may be used to satisfy program requirements in only one department. For example, it cannot count toward both a Physics major (or minor) and a Chemistry major (or minor).

CHEM 406 Summer Undergraduate Research
Units: 0
Description
Documentation of the work of students who receive summer fellowships to conduct research [or produce a creative arts project] in the summer. The work must take place over a minimum of 8 weeks, the student must engage in the project full-time (at least 40 hours per week) during this period, and the student must be the recipient of a fellowship through the university. Graded S/U.
Prerequisites
Approval for summer Arts and Sciences fellowship by faculty mentor

CHEM 417 Organometallic Chemistry
Units: 1
Description
Overview of the structure, reactivity, and applications of organometallic compounds. Topics include main group and transition metal complexes, catalysis, applications to organic synthesis, and bioorganometallic chemistry. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 317 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 419 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Units: 1
Description
Study of principles of chemistry involved in bonding, structure, properties and reactions of main group transition metal, coordination and organometallic compounds with emphasis on periodic trends, thermodynamic, and kinetic factors and symmetry. Three lecture hours per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 309 and 317 (309 may be taken concurrently).

CHEM 421 Senior Seminar
Units: 0
Description
Participation in departmental seminar program, to include regular attendance and one presentation during one of the two semesters. Presentation will include both written and oral component, each prepared on specific topic in chemistry. One class hour per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 322 or Biology 387.

CHEM 422 Senior Seminar
Units: .5
Description
Participation in departmental seminar program, to include regular attendance and one presentation during one of the two semesters. Presentation will include both written and oral component, each prepared on specific topic in chemistry. One class hour per week.
Prerequisites
Chemistry 421.

CHEM 427 Independent Study
Units: .25-1
Description
In-depth exploration of subjects not included in other courses, done independently but under faculty member's supervision.
Prerequisites
Four semesters of chemistry and permission of instructor.

CHEM 433 Special Topics
Units: .5-1
Description
Special course areas covered when sufficient interest exists. Considers subject matter not covered in other chemistry courses. See chemistry department home page (chemistry.richmond.edu) for special topics currently scheduled.
Prerequisites
Permission of instructor.